Columns by John

John Brown has been a wine and food columnist in West Virginia since the 1980’s. His regular columns appear in the Charleston (WV) Gazette-Mail under the title Vines & Vittles and in The State Journal - a statewide business weekly

Wines to Toast the Fourth of July

Independence Day is just around the corner, so I’ve been thinking about wines I’ll use to toast Uncle Sam on his 246th birthday. At the risk of sounding provincial, I’m going to stick with wines from the good old US of A to celebrate the Fourth of July. And since most of us will be consuming picnic-type fare this coming holiday weekend, I’m going to suggest an All-American lineup of wines to pair with your Independence Day meals.

I must (grudgingly) admit, though, that the best wines this country produces are made from European vines (vitis vinifera) like cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay and zinfandel, etc. Unfortunately, native American vines (vitis labrusca) produce better grape juice (concord) and waterfalls (Niagara) than they do wine.

However, there is one European vine, zinfandel, that is commonly thought of as “America’s grape”- even though its original home has been the subject of heated debate. Zinfandel vine cuttings were brought to California and planted in the 1850’s near the town of Sonoma. For years, experts argued that zinfandel is really an Italian grape known as Primitivo. More recent DNA research of the vine, though, indicates that zinfandel is really a Croatian varietal. The true name of the grape is Crljenak – a word that is not only unpronounceable but has also been banned from use in international spelling bee competitions.

I hope you won’t be disappointed, but I think it’s time to move on from this enthralling examination of vine etymology to the slightly less interesting topic of today’s column. So, for your consideration, here are some All-American wine pairing ideas to accompany the foods most of us will be consuming this Fourth of July.

Aperitif

2021 Chateau Ste Michelle Columbia Valley Rose ($15) – From Washington State, this lovely pink wine is comprised of syrah and cabernet sauvignon with a touch of grenache. It’s round, yet crisp, with strawberry and melon flavors and would be great accompaniment to cheese, veggies and dip or fruit. There is no better celebratory wine, especially in the summer, to kick things off for your picnic or holiday dinner than rose’.

 

Veggies/Fish

2021 St. Supery Sauvignon Blanc ($28) – This Napa Valley white is a bit of a richer style sauvignon blanc with hints of citrus and herbs. If you’re a vegetarian, you’ll enjoy this wine because it pairs especially well with grilled veggies like red bell peppers, Vidalia onions, zucchini and asparagus. For you pescatarians out there, the wine will also match up well with grilled white fish such as grouper, Chilean sea bass or cod that is glazed with lemon, dill, butter and minced garlic.

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Barbecue

Seghesio Old Vine Zinfandel ($32) – From Sonoma County, this is a perennial favorite of mine and in my pantheon of great zins which include wines like Ridge, Grgich Hills and Turley. Blackberry and dark cherry flavors with hints of earth and cedar highlight this delicious mouthful of wine. Your main entrée this weekend will likely run the culinary spectrum from hot dogs and hamburgers, to chicken and ribs to pork chops and/or steaks. Seghesio’s versatile flavor profile will enhance your enjoyment of any of the above dishes, even those brushed with some type of barbecue sauce.

Fireworks

2017 Iron Horse Classic Vintage Brut ($48) This Champaign-style sparkler from Sonoma County’s Russian River appellation has ripe pear and green apple flavor with nuances of brioche. Comprised of pinot noir (70%) and chardonnay (30%) it’s the ultimate celebratory American sparkling wine. Just after dark when the Fourth of July fireworks show begins, I’ll lift a glass of Iron Horse and toast Independence Day!

Happy Fourth of July

John Brown is also a novelist. His latest book Augie’s World, which is a sequel to his debut novel, Augie’s War, is available online at Amazon. You can find out more about his novels and wine columns at wordsbyjohnbrown.com

 

 

For wine lovers: Milo’s in Davis

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