Columns by John

John Brown has been a wine and food columnist in West Virginia since the 1980’s. His regular columns appear in the Charleston (WV) Gazette-Mail under the title Vines & Vittles and in The State Journal - a statewide business weekly

Red wine and serving temperature: The Truth!

So, there I was: sitting at a table under a multi-colored umbrella on the deck of a semi-high-class eatery. The weather was very warm, but pleasantly dry, and I had a hankering for a wine that -given the climate and my menu selection– probably qualified as a counterintuitive choice. I wanted a glass of red wine to accompany the grilled octopus I had ordered.

“Are you sure about that, sir?” my officious wait person asked in a snickering and patronizing voice. “I have a lovely pinot grigio which would pair much better with our polpo alla griglia,” he added with a bit of a flourish, obviously flaunting his Italian linguistic skills.

I smiled up at the fellow and repeated my request, disregarding the look of disdain and disapproval on his face. In a few moments he returned with my glass of pinot noir and then left in a huff. The wine was tepid, almost warm. I waved my waiter over and asked if he had any bottles of red that were a bit cooler. I didn’t even ask for pinot noir. I just wanted a glass of red – any red – that would provide a bit of cooling contrast to the grilled octopus.

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Without hesitation, he scolded me with the standard (and archaic) reply that red wine should be served at room temperature. I didn’t bother to remind him that we were outside, and that the temperature was 90 plus degrees Fahrenheit. I just asked him to bring me a glass of ice and a spoon. Of course, he was appalled when I proceeded to add two or three cubes to my pinot noir, stirring the wine for a few seconds before retrieving what was left of the ice from my glass.

I know I’ve written about red wine and proper serving temperature before, so I won’t go into any more detail on the subject other than to remind you that the above-mentioned adage was first uttered in the 1500’s. Rooms back then were a lot cooler -even in the summer. The most compatible wine and food pairing cannot overcome a red that is served too warm. The only way to enjoy a red wine that is served too warm is to have your waiter take it back and put it in ice or ask for an ice bucket. At home in the summer, I always put the red I intend to open at dinner in the refrigerator for about a half hour. However, if you’re in a restaurant and the red you’ve ordered by the glass is warm, don’t be afraid to ask for some ice and a spoon. You may get some strange looks, but you’ll be a lot happier with the wine.

Most often, red wine is chosen to enhance meals with some type of protein, usually beef, pork, lamb or even fish such as salmon. But you can also use reds to pair with grilled or sauteed vegetables. I love to drink red wine with one of my all-time favorite dishes: fried peppers, Italian style.

Here’s the simple, but delicious recipe. You’ll need at least two red, yellow and green bell peppers, two or three hot banana peppers as well as salt, black pepper, onions, garlic, basil and parsley. Slice the all the peppers in three-inch-long pieces, discarding the seeds, and then coarsely chop one large onion. Using a cast iron skillet, heat about a quarter cup of olive and add the peppers and onions, at medium-high heat, to the pan. After about five minutes, add three cloves of coarsely chopped garlic to the mix along with several shakes of salt and black pepper. Stir often so the veggies don’t burn, but you’ll want them to get slightly scorched. Once the peppers are cooked, plate them and add freshly chopped basil and parsley to the mix. Serve the peppers with crusty bread and enjoy.

Here are two red wines that really enhance the recipe above. And, of course, they should be served slightly chilled.

2019 Castello di Bossi Chianti Classico ($23) – From Tuscany, this 100 percent Sangiovese is the essence of why Chianti Classico is such a wonderful accompaniment to food. It’s medium-bodied, but ripe, with flavors of dark plums, a touch of anise and a kiss of oak. Perfectly balanced, the wine pairs seamlessly with the tangy fried pepper concoction.

2020 Martin Ray Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($21) Ripe red cherries and hints of cinnamon highlight this fruit forward pinot noir. The wine has a silky texture and is perfectly balanced from grapes grown in the cool temperatures of the Sonoma coast. This pinot noir provides a refreshing counterpoint to the rich and spicy flavors of the fried peppers

John Brown is also a novelist. His latest book Augie’s World, is a sequel to his debut novel, Augie’s War. Both novels are available in print and audio  at Amazon. You can find out more about his novels and wine columns at wordsbyjohnbrown.com

 

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